Loss of control Accident Cessna 182R Skylane N9474E,
ASN logo
ASN Wikibase Occurrence # 44595
 
This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information. If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.

Date:Monday 10 January 2005
Time:20:10
Type:Silhouette image of generic C182 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different    
Cessna 182R Skylane
Owner/operator:Civil Air Patrol
Registration: N9474E
MSN: 18268418
Year of manufacture:1984
Total airframe hrs:3843 hours
Fatalities:Fatalities: 2 / Occupants: 2
Aircraft damage: Destroyed
Category:Accident
Location:Monroe, LA -   United States of America
Phase: Approach
Nature:Private
Departure airport:Monroe Regional Airport, LA (MLU/KMLU)
Destination airport:
Investigating agency: NTSB
Confidence Rating: Accident investigation report completed and information captured
Narrative:
On January 10, 2005, approximately 2010 central standard time, a Cessna 182R, N9474E, impacted the shallow waters of a swampy collection pond about eight miles northeast of Monroe Regional Airport, Monroe, Louisiana. Both occupants, each of whom held a commercial pilot certificate, received fatal injuries, and the aircraft, which was owned and operated by the Civil Air Patrol (CAP), was destroyed by the impact sequence. The local CFR Part 91 instrument proficiency flight, which departed Monroe Airport about 65 minutes prior to the accident, was being operated in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) at the time of the accident. While in flight, the pilot had received a local instrument clearance to the Monroe Airport. There was no report of an ELT activation.

The two Civil Air Patrol pilots took off on a dark night in order to shoot a number of practice instrument approaches in VFR conditions. The pilot who was believed to be sitting in the left seat and shooting the approaches was not instrument current at the time. After shooting the first approach, and just after being cleared for the second, the crew was advised that the ceiling had become 900 feet broken and that the field was then IFR. When queried by the controller, the crew said they wanted to continue their series of approaches via an IFR clearance. During the second approach they had trouble intercepting the localizer, and although they had by that time decided to make the next landing a full-stop, because they could not get established on the localizer, they eventually had to execute a missed approach. During the next approach they again had trouble getting established on the localizer, and when advised that they had a C130 following them on an approach for landing, the crew requested another missed approach. During that missed approach, while making a climbing turn in order to be repositioned for another approach, the flying pilot lost control of the aircraft, which descended into the waters of a shallow water collection pond/swamp.

Probable Cause: The failure of the pilot manipulating the controls to maintain aircraft control during a night missed approach in instrument meteorological conditions. Factors include a dark night and low ceilings.

Accident investigation:
cover
  
Investigating agency: NTSB
Report number: 
Status: Investigation completed
Duration:
Download report: Final report

Sources:

NTSB: https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20050125X00103&key=1

Location

Images:



Photos: NTSB

Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
28-Oct-2008 00:45 ASN archive Added
21-Dec-2016 19:24 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
06-Dec-2017 06:52 ASN Update Bot Updated [Operator, Other fatalities, Destination airport, Source, Narrative]
31-May-2023 19:47 Ron Averes Updated [[Operator, Other fatalities, Destination airport, Source, Narrative]]

Corrections or additions? ... Edit this accident description

The Aviation Safety Network is an exclusive service provided by:
Quick Links:

CONNECT WITH US: FSF on social media FSF Facebook FSF Twitter FSF Youtube FSF LinkedIn FSF Instagram

©2024 Flight Safety Foundation

1920 Ballenger Av, 4th Fl.
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
www.FlightSafety.org